Bay Court Juvenile Drug Court

Juvenile Drug Court is a positive, innovative, and cost-effective approach to dealing with youth who have a substance abuse history and are involved with the court system. This program targets the addict, not the pusher. The program is an outpatient, three-phase approach to substance abuse treatment which lasts approximately six to twelve months in length, targeting juvenile offenders ranging from ages 13 to 17.

Phase I

  • 4-6 weeks of outpatient treatment
  • At least 2 hours of group sessions 4 days a week, family group 2 times a month;
  • Urinalysis 5 times weekly
  • Attend court twice a month as directed
  • Twelve Step work
  • Individual sessions at least once a month

Phase II

  • 10 weeks of outpatient treatment
  • At least 2 hours of group sessions 3 days per week, family group 2 times a mo.
  • Urinalysis 4 times weekly
  • Attend court twice a month as directed
  • Twelve Step work
  • Individual sessions at least once a month

Phase III

  • 10 weeks depending on progress in treatment
  • At least 2 hours of group sessions once a week
  • Urinalysis twice weekly
  • Attend court once a month as directed
  • Twelve Step work
  • Individual sessions at least once a month
  • Obtain GED or enroll in GED preparedness class (if not currently attending public school)

How Does an Individual Enter the Juvenile Drug Court Program?

There are certain factors the Drug Court team reviews when considering an individual for admission into Juvenile Drug Court.

Examples of frequently used eligibility requirements for Drug Court are as follows:

  • Non-violent drug offenses: drug possession charges, drug purchasing charges, may include possession with intent to sell
  • Demonstrated substance abuse problems
  • Stability in the home
  • Limited criminal history

Some factors or behaviors can exclude individuals from Juvenile Drug Court. Offenders with both addiction and mental health problems present difficult obstacles. Also, offenders whose primary criminal involvement is in manufacturing and selling illegal substances or who have little family support typically make poor candidates for drug court.